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  • Future Patterns Release Night

    02.12.22 @ OHM, Berlin Featuring Spekki Webu, Nicole & DBR (live) What will the dancefloors of tomorrow feel like? What forces will inspire expression and movement? How will technology influence creativity? What will music sound like? -- Future Patterns is an annual VA project that invites both artists and listeners to explore the future of electronic music and the forces that will shape it. Join Patterns of Perception and Minimal Collective at OHM Berlin to celebrate the launch of the VA series, featuring a future-gazing live set from DBR, plus colourful, driving DJ sets from Spekki Webu and Nicole. All profits from this event and the Future Patterns project will be donated to Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk. The Future Patterns 01 VA compilation is now available to pre-order via Bandcamp. Selected listening Future Patterns VA DBR Nicole Spekki Webu More info: Facebook / Resident Advisor

  • Introducing Future Patterns: Annual VA series with Minimal Collective

    We’ve joined forces with our friends from Minimal Collective to launch an annual VA project, Future Patterns, which invites both artists and listeners to explore the future of electronic music and the forces that will shape it. The project takes the form of a various artists compilation release available digitally and as a limited edition CD with accompanying 3D animated artwork and visualisation. Pre-order your copy via Bandcamp now. This is not your standard VA compilation: the partnership with Minimal Collective means the project has just as much focus on the visuals as on the music, with the aim of pushing the boundaries of multidisciplinary craft within the contemporary electronic music industry. Out November 30, the first compilation features music from C-Refund, DBR, HOMI, Jasmin, Jay Duncan, Konduku, Mary Lake, Nali, Nicole, Solid Traveller, Spekki Webu & Altjira, Sunju Hargun and VC-118A, as well as visuals by Rotterdam-based, Italian-born artist Deborah Mora. The project was initiated and co-ordinated by the Patterns of Perception team, with visual concept and direction by Minimal Collective, an Amsterdam-based platform and artistic network operating at the intersection of music, art, and technology. All profits from the first release will be donated to the German children’s charity Deutsches Kinderhilfswerk. Through Deborah Mora’s approach, which is situated between the physical and the immaterial, the visual concept of the Future Patterns release weaves together natural and fantastical forms as a means of depicting new worlds, but also as ways of tapping into a reality that is already present – resembling the experimental visions that the musical concept of Future Patterns seeks to provoke. Deborah has presented work and performed at festivals such as FIBER (Amsterdam), Balance Club Culture (Leipzig), GOLF (Haarlem), Mediamediterranea (Pula) and FAKE ME HARD (Rotterdam). Artists were invited to submit music in response to the concept based on a series of questions about the industry’s future including: What will the dancefloors of tomorrow feel like? What forces will inspire expression and movement? How will technology influence creativity? What will music sound like? These questions will be further explored through future releases and emerging Future Patterns side projects. Future Patterns 01 was mastered in Berlin by Patterns of Perception’s Andreas Maan. The compilation is now available for pre-order via Bandcamp, with a release party at Berlin’s OHM club on December 2.

  • A chat with HOMI

    Before the pandemic began, two members of our collective (Steve Duncan and Kim Bergstrand) went to a techno party together in Helsinki. The set that stood out from all the rest that evening was from a local artist called HOMI: in Steve’s words, his sound was delicate, detailed, percussive and psychedelic, yet with groove and power. They connected after the set and became good friends, setting the wheels in motion for the second release on the Patterns of Perception label. More than two years later, we can still hear the similarities between that first live set and HOMI’s Välitila EP. In the lead-up to the record’s release on November 4, we caught up with HOMI to hear the story behind the record from his perspective and to explore some of his more unexpected influences – from the DIY ethos he brings into his studio space to the impact of becoming a dad not so long ago. You can listen to previews of PTN02 on Soundcloud and pre-order your copy via Bandcamp. Where does the story of this EP begin for you? For this particular record, it started I'd say already two years ago, or even more. We got a studio space with my friend here in Helsinki, and I moved my production completely there. Before that I was doing music at home all the time, like in all the cracks in life: in the morning, in the afternoon and at lunch hour, really just all the time. Then I started to spend good eight to 10-hour days at the studio. Music-making and being with music were more focused on these intense bursts in the studio, so that was quite a shift. At the same time, I changed my production. Before I didn't build a track by multi-tracking, I was jamming basically. All the instruments, synths and whatnot, were always on. When I was finished recording, I just erased everything so there's no going back. Now I started to do a multi-track recording and arrangements which evolved over time. And the arrangement process itself, it took place over time. So I started to kind of prototype tracks – I’d do 2, 3, 4 prototypes in one day – and just let them sit there for a week or so. And then I’d see what I created, and what's interesting, and continue working with those. Production-wise, that was a very big change. What impact do you think it had on your sound or the music you were making? It got more complex in the sense that you can imagine that if you're jamming there are limitations on what you can do: you only have a set amount of hands. So that changed things quite radically. When a track has been sitting around for a couple of weeks and you come back to it, you are maybe not interested in some elements anymore. But some are super interesting and you start to focus on those. I tried out things that I wouldn't have tried otherwise. Also at the same time, I got interested in more fast music. Before, BPM-wise, I was usually at like 120 or 30. And nowadays, it's 140, 150. I don’t know why that happened. Any clues about where that came from? These tracks were the first batch in that study of faster music, which nowadays is defacto for me. There was a particular record, which was Rod Modell’s Captagon, that I was listening to. It’s very dubby stuff that’s super fast at times. It’s an absolutely amazing record, the only record that I haven't played in any DJ set. But looking forward to it, maybe one day. Have you had a similar evolution of your sound as a DJ? I haven't been DJing much lately and am more focused on the live. I have a background in guitar playing and live jamming, and the improvisation part is the thing that fascinates me the most. I'm most interested in music-making anyway. When you are performing live, you kind of memorise a bunch of stuff that you've created and then you improvise a set based on that. Basically, anything can happen. It sounds like the spontaneity of playing live is what appeals to you most. It’s absolutely the key. I'm not the guy who likes to finish tracks; I'm not the finishing type of guy. I just love making music and improvising – the finishing of a track is almost secondary or the byproduct of music-making for me. Every once in a while you have to nail things down, and that comes when you feel you have something to say. It's the moment that you say, ‘this is interesting and this is what I want people to hear’. Music-making has also always been an escape in some sense. Music is a space where the rules and the axiomatic facts of life don't hold true anymore. You can do whatever you want. You can do anything, and it’s okay as long as you dig it. You have some very interesting musical projects going on alongside your electronic productions, can you tell me about them? I have been, for maybe two or three years now, practicing and playing West African music. Usually, I play the djembe and DunDuns, and rehearse the traditional songs. It’s a little bit different in the sense that in my production and music making, I am exploring things, but here I am exploring African music and trying to understand and feel what it is about. I don’t improvise so much. I try not to make my own music but get into that music, and express through that. It is an interesting avenue for me to express through something that is already created. Then last year I started making drone metal. It’s electric guitar, which I haven’t done in a decade or longer, but I got interested in that and got sucked into it. It was listening to this album from (American experimental metal band) Sunn O))) called Life Metal. Fuck it was mindblowing. The project was bubbling for maybe two years before I decided I had something to say and started to explore that avenue. It strikes me that these two projects show two sides of your relationship with music: studying and creating. Yeah, the African music is completely about exploring the interest and respect for the music. It’s a tribute to it. The drone metal is the same, but I want to expand the territory or the concept of what it can be by creating new things. I would say the difference is this: being an artist is the expression of something through your own ideas, while musicianship is expressing through an existing piece of music. In a sense, you know what you are doing. For me the artist is totally the opposite: not knowing where you are, but improvising. Has becoming a dad had an influence on your music-making? After becoming a dad, the musical landscape is for me even more open. Even more things are possible now when I am making music. It can be even more abstract. For the last maybe six years I have been very interested in techno and driving music that can live in a club setting. Now the interest is more focusing on explorations, where anything is possible, even more than it was before. I also had to go through quite an identity crisis in one sense, where you really rediscover yourself. Through that kind of discovery, or rediscovery, you start to think about what’s important in music for yourself. And during COVID also, I wasn’t going to clubs and would be a bit lost about what to do (music wise). So then I would always start to fall back to just making something and being amazed at what came out. When was the last time you went to a gig? The last time I went to a gig was with Samuel (van Dijk, aka VC-118A, who contributed a remix to PTN02) to see Autechre. And reflecting back after that, the music that I’m making now, well I don’t even know what it is anymore! It’s more about the shapes, timbres and whatnot, I don’t have any fixed time or anything. It’s just a mesh of sounds. Before the gig, I had been exploring those domains and acquired a SOMA Ornament sequencer. With Autechre, I took it as a sign that this is how it should feel. So the equipment is also quite crucial to this latest evolution of your sound? The equipment is an absolutely huge thing for me, what you can express through certain instruments. I was about to become an instrument builder, that was my childhood dream: inventing instruments that could express certain sounds. I was on that track and the music playing happened instead. What other instruments and equipment have you made yourself? I have always been making stuff with my hands, it could be anything. I built an electric guitar when I was maybe 15 or 16. Then it was like, ‘I can do anything with this’. Then there were keyboards and turntables, and for two-track recording I had a tape machine which I took from school, from language class. It was a kind of hacky solution and I started to do tracks with that. That was maybe 7th grade. I think in 9th grade I got a four-tracker classic tape machine and added more keyboards and turntables, and it just went from there. I can’t believe you built an electric guitar at 15! Where do you think the drive to not just make music but also the actual instruments comes from? I was always the guy who likes to make things with his hands, to create and build things. Somehow it felt natural. And I still create things and build things: lots of the equipment here in the studio has, even on a smaller scale, been made by me. I made these “distorters” with diodes soldered straight into the cable. Very lofi but I still use those on a daily basis. And some of the electronics like delays I created. I even built some of the studio furniture. I see the studio as an instrument itself; it’s my instrument nowadays. The ergonomics of where things are, building the table, putting stuff there: it’s very DIY. I’m constantly building and modifying things. You’ve said that you consider yourself an artist, rather than a musician. Why is that? I consider myself an artist because I like to perform and improvise. I improvise music and present it to others. But musicianship is just a different kind of trade where you have a very, very special relationship with an instrument. The musician, it's a profession. Many of my idols are musicians or have been musicians. I have zero interest in being a musician by making my living with music. Just making the music and sharing it with other people – like-minded people, hopefully – that's the primary goal. And I'm also so very sensitive in that I bet that if my artistic career would kind of get going, it somehow could be influenced by the attraction of making a living out of it. Then it wouldn't be very good for my music making. What drives you as an artist these days then? I don't know what it is. You make music and you find something very interesting and you work with it. You try to express things; it’s all about expression in the end. HOMI’s Välitila EP is out on vinyl and digital on November 4. Pre-order your copy via Bandcamp.

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  • Home | Patterns/Perception

    Introducing Future Patterns: Annual VA series with Minimal Collective Read more Magazine A chat with HOMI HOMI and VC-118A step up for the Patterns of Perception label Selections: 150bpm+ with upsammy & Steve Duncan A chat with Felix K Selections: Psychedelia with Kia, Naone & Steve Duncan A chat with Nali More articles Mix series Aug 9 100 - Felix K Jul 26 99 - Sunju Hargun Jun 14 98 - DJ Leoni More mixes Next party 8 minutes ago Future Patterns Release Night 02.12.22 @ OHM, Berlin Featuring Spekki Webu, Nicole & DBR (live) What will the dancefloors of tomorrow feel like? What forces will... See previous events From the archives Oct 15, 2020 A chat with Vivian Koch When Vivian Koch talks about producing music, she conjures up an almost spiritual, deeply personal process. For her, production is a way...

  • Photos | Patterns/Perception

    Magazine All Interviews Selections Videos Photos Feb 8, 2019 1 min Photo Series: Patterns of Perception in Prague When Patterns of Perception was invited to play a special showcase in Prague in late 2018, photographer and friend Christoph Abatzis came... Post not marked as liked Dec 12, 2018 1 min Photo Series: Patterns of Perception in Milan Not so long ago we had the opportunity to play a Patterns of Perception showcase in Milan. In a year of international exploration and... Post not marked as liked

  • Magazine | Patterns/Perception

    Magazine All Interviews Selections Videos Photos 2 days ago 2 min HOMI and VC-118A step up for the Patterns of Perception label The second release on our label is a small snapshot of the Finnish scene: a collection of fast, psychedelic techno from Helsinki artist... Post not marked as liked Sep 14 2 min Selections: 150bpm+ with upsammy & Steve Duncan To warm up for our party at OHM this coming Friday, September 16, we invited upsammy plus Patterns resident Steve Duncan to share five... Post not marked as liked Jul 9 2 min Selections: Psychedelia with Kia, Naone & Steve Duncan With our annual ://about blank Summer Edition fast approaching, we invited two of the performing DJs Kia and Naone, plus Patterns... Post not marked as liked Nov 30, 2021 7 min A chat with Nicole When it comes to electronic music, Georgia has no shortage of emerging talent – and Patterns of Perception mix series contributor Nicole... Post not marked as liked Nov 14, 2021 11 min A chat with Nali The Patterns of Perception record label most likely wouldn’t have come into being if it weren’t for our friendship with Nali. Based in... Post not marked as liked Oct 26, 2021 2 min Introducing the Patterns of Perception record label Like so many in our community, the past two years have given us pause for reflection and a chance to think about our collective’s future.... Post not marked as liked Oct 1, 2021 14 min A chat with Spekki Webu It might come as a surprise that Spekki Webu has his roots in the worlds of both jungle and gabber. But once you know, you start to hear... 3 likes. Post not marked as liked 3 May 26, 2021 3 min A chat with Diskonnected As a resident of the revered Taiwanese collective Smoke Machine, Diskonnected is both a tastemaker and selector of wide esteem. The... 1 like. Post not marked as liked 1 Apr 1, 2021 11 min A chat with Jane Fitz On a video call from her new house in Florence, where she has recently relocated with her partner, Jane Fitz is having a fangirl moment.... Post not marked as liked Mar 24, 2021 6 min A chat with Millú For those of us watching from afar, Australia seems to be a litmus test for life without COVID. The electronic music scene – which has... Post not marked as liked Feb 28, 2021 11 min A chat with Grant Aaron The first time Grant Aaron went to an event with a chill-out room, everything clicked into place. It was the beginning of a long love... Post not marked as liked Feb 4, 2021 8 min A chat with Sapphire Slows Sapphire Slows is an artist we’ve had our eyes on for a while. A producer, DJ and vocalist, she has made her mark with an impressive body... Post not marked as liked Jan 3, 2021 4 min Selections: Music for a new year If ever there was a new year that's required us to look forward, rather than back, this is the one. Now that the world has collectively... Post not marked as liked Dec 17, 2020 5 min A chat with Ario Followers of ambient music will no doubt know Ario as the man behind Astral Industries, the revered label that fuses reissued work with... Post not marked as liked Dec 6, 2020 6 min A chat with Patrick Russell In all the turmoil of the past months, Patrick Russell has found a fitting coping strategy. Whether spending almost every day in the... Post not marked as liked Oct 15, 2020 7 min A chat with Vivian Koch When Vivian Koch talks about producing music, she conjures up an almost spiritual, deeply personal process. For her, production is a way... Post not marked as liked Aug 24, 2020 9 min A chat with Woody92 For Woody92, preparing a mix is like putting the pieces of a puzzle together. This approach was on full display in his recent... Post not marked as liked Jul 21, 2020 10 min A chat with Suski As a university student in her native Finland, Susanna Nuutinen found the perfect setup to hone her skills. Susanna, also known by her... Post not marked as liked May 12, 2020 8 min A chat with Resom For a DJ with as busy a gig roster as Resom, you’d imagine the ongoing lockdown would lead to stillness and calm. Instead, having already... Post not marked as liked Apr 6, 2020 6 min Selections: Music for self-isolation Along with all the other changes happening around us, the way we listen to music has also shifted. Just a few weeks ago, many of us were... Post not marked as liked Feb 28, 2020 2 min Selections: DJ SO From the nature to the music, Japan has been an inspiration for our collective since the very beginning. We’re excited to bring this... Post not marked as liked Feb 26, 2020 4 min A chat with Timnah Sommerfeldt Deeply embedded in the Basel scene, surrounded by good friends with a shared passion for music, Timnah Sommerfeldt’s style as a selector... Post not marked as liked Feb 20, 2020 3 min Selections: Antonio Giova & Lara Palmer An ambient space is more than just a chill-out area: done well, it can add an extra layer to the club experience. This was our goal in... Post not marked as liked Dec 4, 2019 4 min A chat with Lux This year has been one of memorable moments for Lux: it was the year of her first Asia tour, her first set at Berghain, and many other... Post not marked as liked Dec 3, 2019 4 min Selections: 2019 Retrospective Leading up to our final party of 2019, the six members of our collective have selected 10 stand-out tracks heard or played over this past... Post not marked as liked Oct 24, 2019 8 min A chat with Eric Cloutier You only have to look at Eric Cloutier’s gig roster from the past month to get a sense of his versatility as a DJ. Whether he’s making... Post not marked as liked Aug 5, 2019 4 min Selections: Kia You can almost feel the warmth of the sun in the sound of some Australian artists – and up-and-coming Melbourne DJ Kia is no exception.... Post not marked as liked Jun 26, 2019 11 min A chat with Avancera (Dorisburg and Kalawila) Friends for over a decade, the bond between Alexander Berg and Robin Jonsson is clear from the moment our conversation begins. Yet the... Post not marked as liked May 16, 2019 8 min A chat with Peter Van Hoesen In his studio near Berlin’s Hermannplatz, Peter Van Hoesen is unfazed about a broken guitar string. In town for a few days from Majorca,... Post not marked as liked Mar 25, 2019 2 min A chat with Nuel From his hometown of Rimini, within a short walk of the sea, Italian DJ Nuel (real name Manuel Fogliata) has been quietly searching for... Post not marked as liked Mar 22, 2019 3 min A chat with Grand River Grand River, real name Aimée Portioli, is many things: composer, producer, DJ. The Dutch-Italian musician is just as likely to create... Post not marked as liked Feb 8, 2019 1 min Photo Series: Patterns of Perception in Prague When Patterns of Perception was invited to play a special showcase in Prague in late 2018, photographer and friend Christoph Abatzis came... Post not marked as liked Dec 20, 2018 8 min A chat with Eluize Moving from Australia to Berlin had a deep impact on Eluize’s sound. Away from the outdoor parties that are a staple of the summertime... Post not marked as liked Dec 12, 2018 1 min Photo Series: Patterns of Perception in Milan Not so long ago we had the opportunity to play a Patterns of Perception showcase in Milan. In a year of international exploration and... Post not marked as liked Nov 9, 2018 8 min A chat with Chris SSG Once a documenter of the deep techno scene, Chris Hobson, aka Chris SSG, has now emerged as a DJ in his own right. As a co-founder of the... Post not marked as liked Aug 28, 2018 6 min A chat with Felix Beltran (Paral·lel Festival) This weekend sees a thousand festival-goers assemble in the mountains outside of Barcelona for Paral·lel, an annual gathering for... Post not marked as liked Aug 12, 2018 8 min A chat with Wanderwelle Amsterdam-based Wanderwelle’s unique brand of invigorating, meditative deep electronica has quickly spread internationally. Their... Post not marked as liked Jun 28, 2018 1 min Selections: Claudio Fabrianesi “Techno music has a long history which began earlier than 1990, but this year is important for me because that’s when I heard Energy... Post not marked as liked Jun 21, 2018 8 min A chat with Alex Albrecht Following the duo’s contribution to the Patterns of Perception mix series last year, Alex Albrecht brings the pair’s sound to Berlin for... Post not marked as liked May 2, 2018 10 min A chat with John Osborn In the late 1990s, John Osborn moved to Berlin in search of creative freedom and to escape London’s daily grind. The veteran DJ and... Post not marked as liked Apr 19, 2018 6 min A chat with Laura BCR Berlin music lovers might recognise Laura BCR from Bass Cadet Records, a vinyl outlet and clothing shop on Neukölln’s Weserstrasse which... Post not marked as liked Feb 8, 2018 5 min Selections: Jacopo's top tracks from Midgar Records Influenced by the soundtrack of mid-nineties video games like Wipeout 2097 and Ridge Racer, Italian-born Jacopo looks beyond the horizon... Post not marked as liked Feb 5, 2018 4 min A chat with Agonis Agonis has earned his growing cult status thanks to an increasingly impressive CV: resident at the club Elysia in Basel, co-founder of... Post not marked as liked Feb 1, 2018 2 min Selections: Paula Koski Paula Koski is a relative newcomer to techno, having started DJing just one year ago. In that short time, the Finnish talent has played... Post not marked as liked Dec 26, 2017 5 min A chat with Hydrangea Earlier this month, French producer Hydrangea delivered us a mix that she described as a musical trip for a forest walk, crafting an... Post not marked as liked Nov 28, 2017 6 min A chat with Wa Wu We On December 1, Patterns of Perception hosts the first extended live set from Wa Wu We, an alias of revered producer Sebastian Mullaert.... Post not marked as liked Sep 21, 2017 5 min A chat with Fjäder Ida Matsdotter, aka Fjäder, is a Swedish DJ on the rise. Deeply influenced by the natural surroundings of her island base outside... Post not marked as liked Aug 1, 2017 8 min A chat with Consumer Refund One of the most captivating new voices in Berlin’s electronic music scene is Consumer Refund. A multi-talented artistic channel of... Post not marked as liked Jun 16, 2017 1 min Selections: A. Brehme & Hysteria Ten tracks that represent our current sounds and inspiration. Compiled by A. Brehme and Hysteria. Selected by A. Brehme From Dyson... Post not marked as liked Jun 14, 2017 4 min A chat with Amandra On June 16, Patterns of Perception hosts the German debut of revered producer Amandra. One half of Ahrpe Records, he co-founded the label... Post not marked as liked

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